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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
's renewed campaign come as the latest polls show president obama lead big six points in eye but locked in a tight balle with romney in new hampshire and wisconsin. nearly all interviews conducted before hurricane sandy, which just might end up being the defining moment of this election. joining me today to discuss all of this and more, msnbc political analyst and national affairs editor for "new york" magazine, john heilemann. msnbc political analyst and executive editor of msnbc.com, richard wolffe. msnbc political analyst, jonathan alter of bloomberg view, and msnbc political analyst and former dnc, karen finney, hopefully joining us shortly. john, i go to you first. in terms of sandy being an inflection point, game changer, if you will, a term we do not toss around lightly, are we -- is it -- is it a game changer? can you prognosticate that far? do you think the president is stronger coming out of the sandy response as a candidate? >> look, there's no question that if you think about this storm and what it's done to the media environment over the course of the week, it's blackout co
could play the deciding role, with 55 million of them eligible to vote. according to a recent pugh poll, president obama is whomping, i believe that's a technical term, mitt romney by 25 points among that group. in many respects, the election has become a choice between the past versus the future, a choice between a bygone era and a brave new world. joy reed explores this dynamic, writing it takes for granted that billy might have two moms or two dads, or that the ceo might be a she. it could care less if guys serve in the military. it can't imagine abortion or conservatives being illegal. i thinks madmen is a good tv show, but so is the walking dead. cecil richards is the president of planned parenthood. and today she is joining us behalf of the obama campaign. part of my favorite thing is how much i get to see you. thanks for joining the program, as always. >> thanks for having me back. >> cecil, the numbers on women voting in this election, and the number of women who are single, i quoted that, 25% is a shocking margin. i wonder what you make of that. and then let's talk about this g
by that? >> no. if you look at the poll numbers and see obama up 11 points in new jersey, it's math on christie's part. the government will be depended on for a lot of money in new jersey to rebuild and recover from this. it makes sense on a bunch of different fronts. there is something important that christie did that is like worth noting and talking about which is, it's an important role in crises like this disasters for politicians to register the sort of emotional seriousness of it, the gravity of it and he did that really well. i was -- i have never listened to chris christie intently as i did yesterday on the radio and you fogh in most circumstances i find him to be an obnoxious blowhard and i was hanging on to his every word and it felt important and meaningful. i think that's to his veds it and e -- credit and even maureen dowd taking shots at him this morning, acknowledged that too. he obviously cares about this area, about his state and about this area of the state hit hard and i think that's legitimate. >> emotional seriousness is what christie does. other times you find
the impact of money on these races. we spent a lot of time saying obama was going to get swamped by advertising, probably going to have more money in their campaign but with the outside groups factored in. i think the presidential race and the polls have sort of shown this, he's kind of immune to that. at the presidential level so much free media coverage. everybody can if follow this race without looking at television advertising. as long as you can reach a threshold at the presidential level i don't think money will be the reason you win or lose a race. where money matters more, the interesting test, i don't know what's going to happen, what about the house and senate races. the house races where there's really no free media coverage, if you have these super pacs coming in just now and targeting a few districts here and there, with candidates who nobody -- who is going to go into the voting booth in a week and a half never heard of, the money can have a bigger impact there. >> shepherd, the question like almost like a nuclear arms race, you have to have it to run. but at the sa
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)